Research and News

What motivates someone to seek treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms?
Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) can have a negative impact on quality of life. Yet not all of those who report having LUTS seek clinical care for their symptoms. In a paper in The Journal of Urology, the Symptoms of Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Research Network (LURN) sought to understand and evaluate reasons why people do or do not seek treatment for LUTS. Read more... 

Starting sevelamer may reduce mortality risk among hemodialysis patients
People with end-stage renal disease often have abnormally high levels of phosphorus in their blood, which raises their risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Calcium-based phosphate binders have been the standard treatment for many years, but a newer treatment, sevelamer hydrochloride or sevelamer carbonate, is becoming increasingly common as an add-on or alternative therapy. Read more... 

eGFR level alone may tell little about true timing of dialysis initiation
The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) has often been used to study the timing of dialysis initiation, measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at dialysis initiation. However, it is not clear how well this information explains the eGFR variation at dialysis initiation, nor how well eGFR serves as a measure for the timing of dialysis initiation. Read more... 

Modifying liver blood flow in liver transplant recipients
The portal vein and hepatic artery carry blood to the liver. If blood flow through the portal vein is too high, it can lead to graft failure in liver donation recipients. Researchers have investigated how reducing the blood flow through the portal vein can improve outcomes in living donor liver transplantation recipients. Read more... 

Can changes in Medicare payments reduce potential disparities in peritoneal dialysis?
Recent policy changes have affected the way that Medicare pays for dialysis. As with any new health care payment model, there is a need to determine whether these changes affect health disparities. In a new paper, investigators evaluated the effect of these changes on potential disparities in the use of one type of dialysis: peritoneal dialysis. Read more...